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Scientific Support


Designed With A Purpose In Mind

Extend Nutrition products are designed to improve the lives of the people who enjoy them. We stand confidently behind our products because they are proven to be effective. As verified by the results of 6 clinical studies and by 17 international patents, our products are effective in helping to control blood sugar and limit hunger.

 

Listed below are abstracts for the clinical studies performed on our product and its key ingredient, uncooked corn starch, as well as links to full results of each study.  Also listed are each of the 17 international patents that our products hold.

 

 

  1. Evaluation of a snack bar containing uncooked cornstarch in subjects with diabetes

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    Performed By: Kaufman FR, Halvorson M, Kaufman ND; Department of Pediatrics, Childrens Hospital, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

     

    Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a snack bar containing uncooked cornstarch, equivalent to 1 1/2 starch/bread exchanges (bar 1), compared to a control bar (bar 2), on the incidence of nocturnal and morning hypoglycemia in subjects with diabetes. Adolescent campers and counselors with diabetes (n = 79) were randomly assigned to Group A (5 nights of snack bar 1 as the evening snack, followed by 5 nights of snack bar 2) or Group B (5 nights of snack bar 2 as the evening snack, followed by 5 nights of snack bar 1). Midnight and morning finger stick blood glucose levels were compared to determine the incidence of hypoglycemia (< 60 mg/dl) and hyperglycemia (> 250 mg/dl), and events were analyzed for the total cohort, Group A, and Group B and by glycated hemoglobin quartile to determine the effect of each bar on glycemia. For subjects with diabetes there was a significant decrease in the number of hypoglycemic episodes with bar 1 compared to bar 2 at midnight (total cohort and Groups A and B) and in the morning (total cohort and Group A). There was a significant decrease in the number of subjects to ever experience hypoglycemia with snack bar 1 compared to snack bar 2, a significantly lower incidence of hyperglycemic episodes at midnight with snack bar 1, and no difference in the incidence of hypoglycemia by glycated hemoglobin quartile. These data suggest that the snack bar containing uncooked cornstarch can diminish night time and morning hypoglycemia in subjects with diabetes, without causing hyperglycemia.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Extend Nutrition's benefits are proven by the results of clinical studies

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  3. The effect of extend bar containing uncooked cornstarch on night-time glycemic excursion in suspects with type 2 diabetes

     

    Performed By: Maryellen Dyer-Parziale; Casa Pacifica Medical Clinic, 1722 S Lewis Rd, Camarillo, CA 93012, USA.

     

    Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of ingesting a snack bar containing uncooked cornstarch (Extend Bar, Clinical Products, Limited, Key Biscayne, FL) on nocturnal glycemic excursion in 28 adults (ages 22-78 years) with type 2 diabetes mellitus (mean HbAlc 8.21 ± 1.28%). Thirteen subjects were treated with oral agents, eight with a combination of insulin and oral agents, and seven with insulin alone. Subjects ingested the study bar (Extend Bar, containing 30 g of total carbohydrate, including 5 g of uncooked cornstarch, 3 g protein, and 3 g fat) for three evenings followed by a placebo bar for 3 evenings (30 g of total carbohydrate, 3 g protein, and 3 g fat), or vice versa. Pre-snack before bedtime, midnight and before breakfast finger stick blood glucose levels were compared to determine the incidence of hypoglycemia ( < 60 mg/dl), hyperglycemia ( > 250 mg/dl), and to calculate any differences in the group's mean blood glucose levels when ingesting the study versus the placebo bar. There were no episodes of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia The mean blood glucose levels pre-snack at bedtime were nearly identical (Extend Bar value 117.5 ± 45.6 mg/dl; placebo bar value 117.3 ± 40.0 mg/dl; P = 0.977), and lower at midnight and before breakfast on the Extend Bar nights compared to the placebo bar nights (Extend Bar, midnight value 127.9 ± 3 1.0 mg/dl; placebo bar midnight value 148.2 + 32.1 mg/dl; P = 0.0001; Extend Bar breakfast value 114.2 ± 15.8 mg/dl; placebo bar breakfast value 158.49 ± 30.3 mg/dl; P < 0.0001). These data suggest that ingesting Extend Bar containing uncooked cornstarch as the nighttime snack may be an effective strategy to lesson the frequency of nocturnal and morning hyperglycemia in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  5. A study to assess the efficacy of Extend Bar® as an appetite suppressant in males and females. A crossover study in moderately overweight subjects with BMI 27-31

     

    Performed By: Glen Sussman, Ph.D. and Arush Anigrass, B.S.;  Illinois Center for Clinical Trials, Chicago, IL, USA.

     

    Abstract: There are always several items of interest that appear on the market every year to Promote weight loss or to help metabolic processes increase efficiency in order to indirectly cause, weight loss. One such method used to reach such goal is to decrease food consumption by either causing individuals to be satiated for longer periods of time or by simply providing stimulus of satiety such that food need not be consumed. Extend Bar® uniquely attempts to influence both criteria by providing a long-acting carbohydrate snack bar containing uncooked cornstarch. This study is designed to assess the efficiency of each 40 gram bar in terms of taste and calorie intake. Essentially, the capability of Extend Bar® as a potentially adequate appetite suppressant in adults will be evaluated in this pilot study.

     

     

     

  6. Use of uncooked cornstarch to avert nocturnal hypoglycemia in children and adolescents with type I diabetes

     

    Performed By: Kaufman FR and Devgan S; Department of Pediatrics, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, University of Southern California School of Medicine, USA.

     

    Abstract: Intensive management of type I diabetes mellitus may lead to a significant increase in hypoglycemia. This study evaluated the use of uncooked cornstarch to avert hypoglycemia in 13 patients, ages 3.0-17.5 years, with diabetes and a history of nighttime hypoglycemia. The usual bedtime snack (Standard Snack Period) was given for 14 days followed by 14 days in which 25%-50% of the carbohydrate content was given as uncooked cornstarch in milk (Test Snack Period). Blood glucose levels were obtained at 0200 and before breakfast during the 28-day study. No difference was found between the mean (+/- SD) before breakfast blood glucose levels during the two periods; however, the mean (+/- SD) number of hypoglycemic episodes (blood glucose < 60 mg/dl or 3.3 mmol/l) was reduced significantly during the test snack period at both 0200 (p < 0.025) and before breakfast (p < 0.01) compared to standard snack period (standard snack 2.00 +/- 2.12 versus test snack 0.61 +/- 0.87 at 0200, standard snack 2.61 +/- 2.25 versus test snack 0.69 +/- 1.03 before breakfast). in addition, in four children who were evaluated with every-2-h glucose levels through the night, stable glycemia was achieved after cornstarch ingestion. our results suggest that uncooked cornstarch may be useful to decrease the frequency of nocturnal hypoglycemia in type i diabetes patients. this low-cost, simple intervention might be considered as an adjunctive therapy to diminish the risk of intensive diabetes management.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Extend Nutrition's benefits are proven by the results of clinical studies

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  8. A randomized, blinded trial of uncooked cornstarch to diminish nocturnal hypoglycemia at Diabetes Camp

     

    Performed By: Kaufman FR, Halvorson M, and Kaufman ND; Department of Pediatrics, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, CA, USA.

     

    Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine if uncooked cornstarch, as part of the evening snack, can avert nocturnal hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Fifty-one campers and counselors at the American Diabetes Association Camp in San Bernardino, CA were randomly assigned to receive 5 g of uncooked cornstarch as part of the 21:00 evening snack vs. a standard snack of equivalent carbohydrate content. Each snack was given for five nights and the participants and medical personnel were blinded as to assignment. Midnight and 07:00 finger stick blood glucose levels were compared with values <60 mg/dl defined as hypoglycemia and values > 250 mg/dl defined as hyperglycemia. RESULTS: There were 218 midnight and 222 07:00 values for comparison. There were six episodes of hypoglycemia at midnight and nine episodes of hypoglycemia at 07:00 for the cornstarch snack nights vs. 30 hypoglycemia episodes at midnight and 21 at 07:00 for the standard snack nights (P < 0.001 and <0.05, respectively). there was no difference in the number of hyperglycemic events at midnight or 07:00 for the cornstarch vs. standard snack nights. at midnight, 12% of campers had hypoglycemia after the cornstarch snack vs. 46% after the standard snack (p < 0.001), and at 07:00, 16% had hypoglycemia after cornstarch vs. 26% after the standard snack (p = 0.327). conclusions: these data suggest that uncooked cornstarch, as part of the evening snack, can diminish the nighttime and morning hypoglycemia associated with type 1 diabetes, without causing hyperglycemia.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Extend Nutrition's benefits are proven by the results of clinical studies

    Read Full Study

     

    U.S. Patents

     

  1. Patent No. 5,605,893 "Method of Using a Therapeutic Food Composition to Diminsih Blood Sugar Fluctuations"
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  3. Patent No. 5,843,921 "Therapeutic Food Composition to Diminish Blood Sugar Fluctuations"
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  5. Patent No. 6,339,076 "Therapeutic Food Composition to Diminish Blood Sugar Fluctuations"
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  7. Patent No. 6,534,487 "Methods for Suppressing Appetite and Enhancing Exercise and Recovery"
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  9. Patent No. 6,905,702 "Methods for Regulating Blood Glucose and Appetite Suppression in Type 2 Diabetics"